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Capital Fringe Review: ‘Language From the Land’ by Joel Markowitz

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This was my second dance Fringe experience that featured young dancers. Before the show began we were informed that what we were about to see was put together in one week with 25 young dancers from all around the world (plus three resident artists from Dance Exchange) who gathered at Dance Exchange in Takoma Park, MD to create Language from the Land.

For 50 minutes, dancers of all ages, races, and sizes danced their hearts our, all with immense pride showing on their faces as they slithered across the stage, fell on the stage, danced around the stage  utilizing books and sometimes a chair.

Why books? Perhaps because books allow people from different cultures to share their languages and customs with others around the world. As the dancers were turning the pages of the books, perhaps they were learning something new about the cultures and languages of the new dancers they had recently met and worked together to create this new performance piece.

Why the chair – haven’t figured that one out yet.

Although there were some ‘solos’ – it was the coming together of 28 ‘strangers’ who molded themselves into one ‘family’ of dancers in one week that was the star of the evening. It brought many smiles to everyone in the audience, and although I couldn’t figure out all the ‘themes’ of what was happening on the stage, it was the energy and passion that mattered and there was plenty of that onstage. It was a sight to behold.

Note: The show has closed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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