Meet the Cast of Providence Players’ ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Part 2: Mihara India, playing Calpurnia – by Julie Janson

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The Providence Players of Fairfax will soon premiere the third production of its 19th season, To Kill a Mockingbird, written by Christopher Sergel, directed by Beth Gilles-Whitehead. Tickets for this American classic, based on Harper Lee’s Pulitzer prize-winning novel and one of the best loved stories of all time, are selling as quickly as any show in Providence Players history. In Part 2 of interviews with the cast, director, and crew of To Kill a Mockingbird, meet Mihara India.

Mihara India. Photo courtesy of Providence Players.

Julie: Please tell our readers where they may have seen your work on local stages and roles you have played or significant technical roles you have fulfilled.

Mihara: You may have seen me in the stage production of Bound and Gagged as Tatum Alexander or on BET in Trey Howard’s new gospel video, Remember Me.

Tell us about your role in this production. Have you enjoyed it? How is it important to the show? What is your creative process?

Calpurnia is the Finch’s hard working black housekeeper and nanny who has been with the family since Jem Finch was born. She cooks, cleans, sews, irons and does all of the other household chores but she also disciplines and serves as the substitute mother to the children. Although Cal seems stern, she clearly cares deeply about the family and takes good care of them.

I have greatly enjoyed my role in this production, I believe my character brings ‘balance’ and ‘harmony’ to the Finch family. Calpurnia is a fine, smart and loyal housekeeper but her biggest conflict throughout the story is how society views her. I believe Cal is important to the show because regardless of the circumstances in Maycomb, Calpurnia never loses her values and remains composed to set a good example for Jem and Scout.

My creative process is: preparation, incubation, illumination and implementation.

Mihara India with Brendan Dure and Sophia Manicone in To Kill a Mockingbird. Photo courtesy of Providence Players of Fairfax.

As a classic show, To Kill a Mockingbird has been staged many times. Why should people see this production?

The director, Beth Whitehead, has amazing vision and observation for this production; she challenges the cast to really take a look into the lives of the characters, factoring in all aspects. People should see this production because even though staged many times before, this cast truly embodies the characters and takes you along on a journey in Maycomb, AL, one could never forget.

What do you hope people will take away from seeing To Kill a Mockingbird?

My hope is that people will walk away with a new perspective on equality, freedom, justice, peace and love.

Why do this show now?

Even though this story dates back to the 1930s, common injustices still largely effect our world today. Hopefully my role in this show can create moments of love, laughter and hope, even if it’s only for a few hours. Love conquers all.

An American classic based on the Pulitzer prize-winning masterwork and one of the best-loved stories of all time, To Kill a Mockingbird is a gripping and heart-wrenching tale of coming-of-age in the South. Set in a town poisoned by prejudice, the play portrays a world of great beauty and savage inequities through the eyes of a young girl, Scout, as her father—a crusading local lawyer—risks everything to defend a black man unjustly accused of a terrible crime.

To Kill a Mockingbird plays from March 24 – April 8, 2017 at The Providence Players performing at the James Lee Community Center Theater – 2855 Annandale Road, in Falls Church VA. For tickets, email providenceplayerstickets@cox.net, call (703) 425-6782, and leave a message, or purchase them online (there is no fee).

Here Are Performance Dates And Times:

Thursday, Friday and Saturday 7:30 p.m.

March 24 – April 8

Sunday Matinees 2:00 p.m.

March 26 & April 2

LINK:
Meet the Cast of Providence Players’ ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Part 1: Sophia Manicone, playing Scout – by Julie Janson.

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