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Tag Archives | Aaron Posner

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Review: ‘Our Town’ at Olney Theatre Center

Thornton Wilder’s New Hampshire creation, Grover’s Corners, sits on some of the oldest rock in the world: “a shelf of Devonian basalt” crossed with “vestiges of Mesozoic shale,” we’re told. The oldest headstones in the cemetery are from the late 1600s, and filled with names that still populate Grover’s Corners in 1901, when the play Our […]

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Here are the 2017 Barrymore Awards Nominations

The nominations for the Barrymore Awards for Excellence in Theatre for the 2016-17 season have been announced by Theatre Philadelphia. A total of 23 companies were recognized across 27 categories. 22 of the categories are determined by a group of 60 nominators and 12 judges, all theatre professionals. Five special awards (F. Otto Haas Award for an Emerging […]

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Magic Time!: ‘Broken Glass’ at Theater J

Arthur Miller’s 1994 Broken Glass does not rise to the stature of his greatest works (Death of a Salesman, The Crucible, The Price, and others). But even lesser Miller can be arresting, as the smart and sharp production now playing at Theater J demonstrates. Directed by Aaron Posner with precise attention to each pulse beat, […]

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Review: ‘Broken Glass’ at Theater J

Shards of unseen, but sharply-felt shattered glass, both of a collapsing marriage and the infamous Kristallnacht (Night of Crystal), are fused together in Arthur Miller’s Broken Glass, now playing at Theater J. It is a satisfying evening with an unyielding, rarely-revived drama because of a fine compelling cast under the strong clear direction of Aaron Posner. […]

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Holly Twyford as Aphra Behn. Photo by Grace Toulotte.

Magic Time!: ‘Or,’ at Round House Theatre

As play titles go, Or, is one of the most ungoogleable. It is a search engine dead end. And as an original mashup of past and present, prose and poetry, and performative purposes, Liz Duffy Adams’s  Or, is also one of the most unpeggable. My colleague David Siegel, in his rave review, called the production […]

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Review: ‘OR,’ at Round House Theatre

The revolution will not be televised. Nope, it is on stage at Round House Theatre with a playful, headlong charge of a wild comedy. The comedy is called OR, a fictionalized account of free-spirited, real-life folk who set the theater world on-fire with their outlooks and attitudes. With OR, I was engaged and enraptured by the […]

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Post-Play Palaver: ‘Three Sisters’ and ‘No Sisters’ at Studio Theatre

Post-Play Palaver is an occasional series of conversations between DCMetroTheaterArts writers who saw the same production—in this case the same two productions, Chekhov’s Three Sisters and Aaron Posner’s No Sisters, now both playing at Studio Theatre—and just had to keep talking about what they saw. Senior Reviewer and Columnist Andrew Walker White in his review […]

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Review: ‘Three Sisters’ at The Studio Theatre

As improbable as it may sound, the plays of Anton Chekhov are vivid proof that there is such a thing as joyful melancholy. You can commune with his characters’ misfortunes and acknowledge the essential unfairness of life—the lost loves, missed opportunities, the great and petty slights – while gearing up for another day and, yes, […]

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Review: ‘No Sisters’ at The Studio Theatre

A shout-out to Studio Theatre co-founder Russell Metheny, who designed the complex on 14th Street, for installing a backstage stairway connecting the dressing rooms of the second-floor Milton and the ground-floor Mead. Were it not for that architectural passageway, there could be no No Sisters, and DC would be deprived of Writer-Director Aaron Posner’s latest […]

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Review: ‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?’ at Ford’s Theatre

A sampling of the audio from the packed house should serve as ample description for Ford’s Theatre’s stunning new production of Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?: raucous laughter, groans and sighs, the occasional sharp intake of breath. Director Aaron Posner delivers a Virginia Woolf that is as gut punching, razor sharp, and pitch […]

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DCMetroTheaterArts’ Best of 2016 #16: Best Direction, Musical Direction, and Design in Musicals and Plays in Philadelphia, New York, Delaware, and New Jersey

The DCMetroTheaterArts Staff’s Best of 2016 Direction in Productions in Philadelphia, New Jersey, and DE are: BEST DIRECTION Carl Andress for Charles Busch’s The Divine Sister at Bucks County Playhouse. Steve H. Broadnax III for The Mountaintop at People’s Light & Theatre Company. Tina Brock for Eugène Ionesco’s The Chairs at Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium. Deborah Block, […]

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Review: ‘Stupid Fucking Bird’ at Silver Spring Stage

Stupid Fucking Bird is Aaron Posner’s inspired and irreverent takeoff on Anton Chekhov’s 19th Century play The Seagull. Stupid Fucking Bird follows the plotline of its predecessor, while simultaneously poking fun at it. It became something of an instant classic in its own right when it debuted at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company in 2013 and […]

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In the Moment: Scenic Designer Tony Cisek on his Scenic Design for Folger’s ‘District Merchants’

Over the past nearly two decades, I have always anticipated what multi-Helen Hayes Award Scenic Designer Tony Cisek will bring forth on the Folger Theatre’s intimate stage space with its two iconic, permanent pillars standing so straight and muscular. So, I looked forward to the wizardly Cisek’s scenic design for District Merchants, the new play using […]

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Review: ‘Stupid F#@*ing Bird’ at Port City Playhouse

Port City Playhouse has undertaken the hilarious dark comedy Stupid F#@*ing Bird, by Playwright Aaron Posner. The show is adapted from Anton Chekhov’s The Seagull, but with a very modern makeover and two original songs by Composer James Sugg. With themes of love, sex, loss, and betrayal, the show delves into the struggle between past […]

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Review: ‘District Merchants’ at Folger Theatre

District Merchants, in its world premiere at Folger Theatre, is a tour de force that explores the complexity of race and identity in Reconstruction-era America. As part of Folger Theatre’s 2016 celebration of 400 years of Shakespeare and in tandem with its exhibition America’s Shakespeare, Folger commissioned this very fine reimagining of Shakespeare’s The Merchant […]

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