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Tag Archives | Jewish

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Review: ‘Funny Girl’ at Candlelight Dinner Theatre

What would you rather see: Fanny Brice singing on a tugboat in New York harbor, or a real live Fanny Brice in the Ziegfeld Follies? Funny Girl, the original 1964 Broadway musical, is a real stage animal, revisiting a classic era of American theatre. Most of its scenes are about theatre life and are set […]

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Patricia Richardson. Photo by Joan Marcus.

Review: ‘Other Desert Cities’ at Bucks County Playhouse

In the opening moments of Other Desert Cities, playwright Jon Robin Baitz introduces us to a wealthy Southern California family whose members love to play tennis – but their favorite sport is getting under each other’s skin. This family is on edge, and while the play starts with rather standard conflicts – parents versus children, […]

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Kirsten Quinn, Ian Agnew, and Tyler Brennan. Photo by Mark Garvin.

Review: ‘The Roses in June’ at Seagull Productions

June 1967. What memories does that bring? Sgt. Pepper, The Rolling Stones, bell bottoms, assassinations, the conflict with ’50s conformity, trouble in the Middle East? This is the era summoned by Timothy M. Kolman’s play The Roses in June, which is now receiving its world premiere at Plays and Players Theatre in Philadelphia. If you […]

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New Records: Listening to the Music of 3 Tony-Nominated Shows

New Records is a new column that discusses recordings of theatrical shows. It’s a companion to the theater reviews that appear here on DC Metro Theater Arts. This week, in connection with the Tony Awards, let’s take a look at albums from three of the most accomplished productions of the season: Dear Evan Hansen, Come From […]

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Yannick Nézet-Séguin. Photo courtesy The Philadelphia Orchestra.

Review: The Philadelphia Orchestra Performs Mahler’s Longest — and Greatest — Symphony

Although not frequently performed, the Symphony No. 3 is Gustav Mahler’s most encompassing work, the piece which best exemplifies his life and career. Yannick Nézet-Séguin led a magnificent performance of it during the closing week of The Philadelphia Orchestra’s 2016-17 season. The Symphony No. 3 contains the greatest balance between anguish and love and its finale is […]

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Sasha Cooke. Photo by Dario Acosta.

Review: The Philadelphia Orchestra Presents Leonard Bernstein’s First Major Composition

Leonard Bernstein’s Symphony No. 1 was the major undertaking at The Philadelphia Orchestra’s concerts of May 3, 5 and 6, 2017. Yannick Nézet-Séguin led the piece as a prelude to a year-long celebration of Bernstein’s centenary. (He was born on August 25, 1918.) Nézet-Séguin conducted the concerts in the midst of a three-week stint leading Wagner’s […]

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Review: ‘Ragtime’ at Ford’s Theatre

Glorious! Dazzling! Verve! Bursting at the seams with voices and stories of America’s humanity and originating dreams. These are the words I felt as Ragtime, now at Ford’s Theatre, unfolded before me. And it all began with the show’s opening; a full-company production number in which 24 voices, 48 feet, nine musicians, and an upright […]

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Michael Tilson Thomas. Photo by Kristen Loken.

Review: The Philadelphia Orchestra Performs Seeger, Berg & Beethoven with Guest Conductor Michael Tilson Thomas

Contrast was stark in the concert which Michael Tilson Thomas led with The Philadelphia Orchestra. The first half displayed two radically dissonant pieces from the 1930s — Ruth Crawford Seeger’s Andante for Strings and Alban Berg’s Violin Concerto, while the second half was devoted to Beethoven’s classic Symphony No. 3 (the Eroica). You could make […]

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Any Given Monday at the Stagecrafters Theater

Review: ‘Any Given Monday’ at the Stagecrafters Theater

If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh. Otherwise they’ll kill you. That quote, usually attributed to George Bernard Shaw, aptly describes Any Given Monday, a play by Philadelphia’s very own Shaw, Bruce Graham, that will make you laugh out loud and then stay up all night pondering the author’s moral questions. […]

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Review: ‘Broadway Bound’ at 1st Stage

As self-conscious plays go, Neil Simon’s Broadway Bound is both a self-fulfilling prophesy and a cross-examination of the creative process. The play, which was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and a Tony Award in 1987, is the final and lesser-known installment of Simon’s quasi-autobiographical Eugene trilogy, following Brighton Beach Memoirs and Biloxi Blues. Across the series, Eugene Morris Jerome, […]

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Magic Time! “It’s Our Most Jewish Play This Season”: A Q&A With Adam Immerwahr About ‘The Christians’ at Theater J

For the second show in his first season as artistic director of Theater J, the nation’s largest and most prominent Jewish theater,  Adam Immerwahr picked a play with the counterintuitive title The Christians. Written by Lucas Hnath, who grew up in an evangelical Christian church and at one time considered becoming a minister like his […]

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Review: The Second City’s ‘Unelectable You’ at The Kennedy Center

Billed as “The Second City’s Completely Unbiased Political Revue,” Unelectable You—now in the middle of a four month pre-election national tour—paused in Washington, DC last weekend for a stop at The Kennedy Center’s Eisenhower Theater. More than a thousand people—mostly Hillary supporters—filled the orchestra and both balconies for a two-night stand in which improv morphed […]

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Review: ‘The Whipping Man’ at Fells Point Corner Theatre

Fells Point Corner Theatre (“FPCT”) opened its production of Matthew Lopez’s The Whipping Man on Friday. The second show of FPCT’s “Rescue Me” season, The Whipping Man is a smart, poignant, and surprisingly funny play. It focuses on weighty issues like religion, slavery, family and accountability, but does so with care for the audience. It […]

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Review: ‘The Last Schwartz’ at Theater J

There have been so many plays about dysfunctional families—think about August: Osage County, for example, or The Sisters Rosensweig—that it’s hard to believe that anyone would try to produce another one about warring siblings coming together after a parent’s death. Yet, in the hands of Adam Immerwahr, Theater J’s newly appointed Artistic Director, The Last Schwartz […]

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2016 Capital Fringe Review: ‘Underneath the Lintel’

Pat O’Brien’s solo performance in Underneath the Lintel has been captivating US and Canadian Fringe audiences for eight years now, and it’s not hard to see why. Seeing O’Brien—a longtime star of movies and television—up close and in the flesh is a mind-boggling experience. It’s a virtuoso performance, breathtaking in its depth and speed. Yet […]

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Review: ‘Collected Stories’ at Peter’s Alley Theatre Productions

“You can’t censor your creative impulses because of the danger of hurting someone’s feeling. Write don’t speak it.” This early line of dialogue resonates throughout the emotionally rich, intellectually well-tuned, finely-acted production of playwright Donald Margulies’ Collected Stories at Peter’s Alley Theatre Productions. Tenderly directed by Aly B. Ettman, Collected Stories has a dappled shading to it, […]

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Review: ‘Driving Miss Daisy’ at Act II Playhouse in Ambler, PA

An enchanting version of the familiar tale, Act II Playhouse’s Driving Miss Daisy serves up a delightful cast and a pleasant story that both challenges and charms. Originally written in 1987, Alfred Uhry’s script examines the relationship between an elderly white Atlanta Jewish woman, Daisy Werthan, and the African-American man hired to be her chauffeur, […]

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