Tag Archives | William Shakespeare

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Avant Bard Announces 2017-2018 Season

The exhilarating musical The Gospel at Colonus returns, Lauren Gunderson’s fiery genius Emilie makes her DC debut, and Shakespeare’s fantastical The Tempest takes the stage by storm For its 28th season making theatre on the edge, Avant Bard proudly announces the regional premiere in October of Emilie: La Marquise Du Châtelet Defends Her Life Tonight […]

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Charlotte Northeast. Photo courtesy Shakespeare in Clark Park.

Review: ‘Coriolanus’ at Shakespeare in Clark Park

Coriolanus has a reputation for being one of Shakespeare’s least accessible plays. Its title character, a Roman warrior turned reluctant politician, can be hard to get a bead on – and hard to root for. The play starts with ferocious battles, but soon devolves into arcane political discussions. And its characters’ allegiances shift so quickly […]

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Deb Miller’s Top Picks for the ‘2017 Philadelphia Fringe Festival’

From antiquity to the present, tragedy and drama to absurdism and comedy, masterpieces by classic playwrights to experimental ensemble-devised works by local artists, the 2017 Philadelphia Fringe Festival runs the gamut over the span of eighteen days, from September 7-24, with 158 offerings throughout the city (plus another twelve shows in the Curated Fringe, and […]

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Review: ‘The Tempest’ at Annapolis Shakespeare Company

Annapolis Shakespeare Company’s production of Shakespeare’s The Tempest is a colorful, spirited spectacle. Co-directed by Donald Hicken and Sally Boyett, The Tempest is performed outdoors, in the gardens of the historic Charles Carroll House. It combines talented acting, directing, choreography, and lighting with a beautiful setting for a night of wonderful theater, with magic, romance, and […]

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Rudy Caporaso and Susanna Herrick. Photo by Abby Schlackman.

Review: ‘Hamlet’ at REV Theatre Company

Madness is unleashed among the stoic marble and stone memorial markers of iconic Laurel Hill Cemetery as REV Theatre Company, directed by Rosey Hay, lends life force to the language of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Mad with grief over the his father the King’s untimely death, and enraged by his mother’s quickie marriage to his father’s brother, […]

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Rudy Caporaso and Susanna Herrick. Photo by Abby Schlackman.

‘Hamlet’ at Laurel Hill Cemetery: An Interview with Rosey Hay and Rudy Caporaso of the REV Theatre Company

Every year, the REV Theatre Company fills Laurel Hill Cemetery — Philadelphia’s resting place of the rich, the powerful, and the famous — with an almost cult-like following of theatergoers, who see haunting and memorable versions of melodramatic musical performances. Their new production of Hamlet continues their foray into uncharted territories — a hallmark of […]

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Gregg Henry in the Public Theater's production of Julius Caesar. Photo by Joan Marcus.

Opinion: ‘Julius Caesar, William Shakespeare, and the Fine Art of Dissent’

It’s a classic art-imitating-life-imitating-art situation: to make a production relevant, the director decks out the cast in modern dress to create the illusion that Shakespeare was writing about our time. Then, to heighten the illusion, he scatters actors throughout the audience to ‘stage’ a demonstration—only to find the cast shouted down by real protestors, who […]

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Madalyn St. John.

Review: ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ at Hedgerow Theatre

“The course of true love never did run smooth.” And in the case of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, it hits every bump in the road! One of Shakespeare’s most popular comedies, Midsummer follows the ever-escalating complications surrounding the marriage of Theseus, Duke of Athens, to Hippolyta, Queen of the Amazons. Throw in four young lovers (Lysander, […]

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Jessica Fields and Rodney Landis.

Review: ‘The Taming of the Shrew’ at Exclamation Theater

The Taming of the Shrew is one of Shakespeare’s most controversial plays, one that has spurred argument and discord for over 400 years. Is the play as misogynistic as it often appears, or is its theme just a matter of interpretation? Exclamation Theater’s new production won’t settle any arguments, and it may not win over […]

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West Side Story at The Media Theatre.

Review: ‘West Side Story’ at The Media Theatre

Earlier this season, The Media Theatre presented Shakespeare’s classic Romeo & Juliet. Now they’re concluding their 2016-2017 season with a production of West Side Story, the musical that put a 20th Century spin on the Bard’s story and became a masterwork in its own right. Set in New York’s Upper West Side in the mid-1950s, West […]

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Mattie Hawkinson. Photo by Shawn May.

Review: ‘The Broken Heart’ at Quintessence Theatre Group

It’s unlikely you will be familiar with John Ford’s The Broken Heart. Like most early 17th century playwrights not named Shakespeare, Ford’s works are rarely performed: he’s known almost exclusively for ’Tis Pity She’s a Whore. The Broken Heart was not performed between Ford’s time and 1962, when Laurence Olivier included it in the Chichester Festival’s season. […]

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Christopher Garofalo, John Williams, Lee Cortopassi and Ashton Carter. Photo by Shawn May.

Review: ‘Love’s Labor’s Lost’ at Quintessence Theatre Group

Quintessence Theatre Group brings William Shakespeare’s Love’s Labor’s Lost, as directed by Alexander Burns, vibrantly to life with spectacular staging, scintillating costumes and a sparkling cast. The King of Navarre, Ferdinand (Lee Cortopassi), has convinced his complement of Lords – Berowne (John Williams), Longaville (Ashton Carter) and Dumaine (Christopher Garofalo) – to swear off women […]

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Mary Lee Bednarek and Robert Lyons. Photo by Mark Garvin.

Review: ‘Coriolanus’ at Lantern Theater

Coriolanus is one of Shakespeare’s least-performed plays – probably because it doesn’t fit easily into any of the standard Shakespearean categories. It’s a tragedy, but one without the epic sweep of Othello, Hamlet or Macbeth. Those shows earned their fame by grappling with huge issues and significant figures; Coriolanus deals more with the concerns of the […]

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From PlayPenn to Lincoln Center: A Conversation about ‘Oslo’ with Paul Meshejian and J.T. Rogers

Following its development in 2015 at PlayPenn — the respected thirteen-year-old Philadelphia-based artist-driven organization dedicated to supporting and fostering new work — playwright J.T. Rogers’ Oslo is Broadway bound, scheduled to begin previews at Lincoln Center’s Vivian Beaumont Theater on March 23. The latest play by the award-winning writer, whose previous works include Madagascar (2004) and […]

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