Theatermania’s ‘Capital Fringe Audience Awards’ Winners Announced

1
0
Theatermania.com announced this year’s Capital Fringe Audience Awards tonight.
Here are this year’s winners:
Stephen Spotswood accepts his award for Best Drama for 'We Tiresias.' Photo by Paul Gillis.
(1) Comedy:
(2) Drama:
(3) Musical Theatre & Opera:
(4) Dance & Physical Theatre:
(5)  Best Overall Show:
***************************************************************************************
Two Special Director’s Awards were given and selected by Julianne Brienza:
Yanomi Shoshinz received a special Director's Award for 'A Day in the Life of Miss Hiccup.' Photo by Paul Gillis.
**************************************************************************************
'Fringe Fanatic' Chuck Clay receives his award from Julianne Brienza.Photo by Paul Gillis.
Also announced tonight:
There were:
-891 shows in this year’s Capital Fringe.
-130 productions.
-753 individual performances.
-377 productions sold 50% or more.
-80 sold out performances.
-29,000 tickets were sold.
-1,751 ticket packages sold.

***************************************************************************************

You can view all 134 Capital Fringe Festival reviews on DC Metro Theater Arts  here and here. Read the Preview Articles written by The Capital Fringe participants under the Fringe chart here. We invite you to become daily readers of our site.

Previous article‘Lincoln and God’ at Greenbelt Arts Center by Kim Moeller
Next articleCabaret Review: ‘Revenge of the Understudies’ at Signature Theatre by Jennifer Perry
Joel Markowitz
Joel Markowitz is the Publisher and Editor of DCMetroTheaterArts. He founded the site with his brother Bruce to help promote the vast riches of theatre and the arts in the DC Metro area that includes Maryland, Virginia, and DC theater and music venues, universities, schools, Children's theaters, professional, and community theatres. Joel is an advocate for promoting the 'stars of the future' in his popular 'Scene Stealers' articles. He wrote a column for 5 years called ‘Theatre Schmooze’ and recorded podcast interviews for DC Theatre Scene. His work can also be seen and read on BroadwayStars. Joel also wrote a monthly preview of what was about to open in DC area theatres for BroadwayWorld. He is an avid film and theater goer, and a suffering Buffalo Bills and Sabres fan. Joel was a regular guest on 'The Lunch and Judy Show' radio program starring Judy Stadt in NYC. Joel founded The Ushers Theatre Going Group in the DC area in 1990, which had a 25-year run when it took its final curtain call last year. Joel is a proud member of The American Critics Association.

1 COMMENT

  1. For some reason, I went to Fringe 2 yrs in a row yrs back and then somehow missed it 2 yrs. This year, although I had hoped to attend more shows (and had to miss 2 I paid for), I made up for the recent past. Thanks so much for posting the voting results so fast. They reflect many obvious perspectives but am posting 10 meanderings that I can immed think of:

    (1) There are SO many shows that many of us can’t possibly attend even 1/10 — and while the money goes to a fabulous cause, it can get costly — at least for me. In fact, I tried to sell a ticket and rec’d no takers but one person opined that the Fringe Buttons were a hidden cost. Not that hidden but I did find a $3.50 service charge from home per show somewhat high for Fringe. Next time — yes, a package deal — but that’s not low-cost in my situation these days.

    (2) I didn’t get to see any of the winners so am stunned, amazed and disappointed — and there’s a mix of other emotions. Judging is a tricky business and it takes top-knotch administration and other details to pull it off effectively. Pablum perhaps but all are true winners for getting out there and doing their all. Still, the results clearly show that DC audiences have such varied tastes — a good thing for the most part, yes?

    (3) Two stand-outs for me as a regular and unaffiliated audience member at these: “DC Trash” and “My Princess Bride” (as well as others more serious). How these didn’t garner awards beats me! I know I’m not a “in the minority” fan of these shows. Perfect timing, original, professional to the hilt in presentation, clearly many rehearsals reflecting immense work, great tech as well as super performances that entertained and taught. I wish both were taped to reach a much broader audiece. (Are ANY shows available on DVD or will be?)

    (4) For the first time, I did hang around Fort Fringe frequently (perhaps more than I should have). The sense of community in this fabulous theatre town is very alive and exciting. Of course, I was aware of that before, but Fringe 2012 made the joint buzzzzz w/ such an assortment of folks — professionals, amateurs, appreciators.

    (5) That (above) said, I remain quizzical and dismayed that so many in this town have neve heard of Fringe. What enhanced PR is nec other than word of mouth? Billboards at bus stations? In metro? Cost? (The same is true of many of our theatres; we all have our interests but it’d be gratifying if more residents/visitors were aware. Creative incentives needed?)

    (6) Thanks to so many volunteers at the venues, at Fort Fringe, etc. Without their hard work, spirit, and commitment, esp in the heat, Fringe would not have been a reality. Ditto to the venues that opened up spaces and to whomever else I’ve omitted.

    (7) Wish there were a way that Fringe overall could last longer so we don’t have to run helter-skelter — and still miss some shows. Plus, this festival overlapped aother theatre festival in town. Also, the “No Late Seating” policy made sense given the crunch time to stike a set/show, but was frustrating, esp in cases where audiences could enter quietly in the back if possible. Even our professional and community theatres allow for this if we don’t create a disturbance. Again, with more time between shows, more viewers could calmly attend. Plus, this rush-rush-rush atmosphere added stress to performers, staff, and volunteers — not just to audience members. No real chance to talk to the actors — except maybe later at Fort Fringe.

    (8) Attended the mostly serious “A for Artist” and left with an obvious thought. I advocate on the Hill as a volunteer for various health causes. Do any of us arrange personal visits with our congressional staffers to explain how theatre/arts affect/improve us and others? With Federal (and State/local) cutbacks, I heartily endorse this and these officials work for us. Staffers DO want to hear our PERSONAL stories — not reports filled w/ stats — and the squeaky wheel gets attn — maybe not this year but next — or the next. Frankly, it’s easy to do. Just schedule an appmt when mutually convenient to encourage more cogitation in policy/budget offices.

    (9) Great website and promotional materials but can the font be increased in the hard copy Fringe program next time? And the button be a tad larger as in the past?

    (10) Fun T-shirts — wish I had money left to buy one! Super design and text. :) Maybe offer remaining ones — if they exist — at a discount (if you didn’t already). Or give to at-risk kids to use for great pjs.

    Many thanks and congrats to all.

Comments are closed.