‘Shakespeare’s R&J’ at Signature Theatre by David Friscic

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FOUR STARS
Shakespeare’s R&J, the somewhat hip title ascribed to Joe Calarco’s creative adaptation and intertwining of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet set in a Catholic all-male boarding school, is highly visceral, physical, and jolting – and a very challenging concept for a play. Calarco directs a cast of four very energetic and talented actors at full throttle and with tremendous authority and assurance. From the militaristic opening and right through the various attempts of these four students to wrestle with the demons of their repression as they read and interpret passages from Romeo and Juliet, every movement of each actor and every moment of the play is synchronized and choreographed with meticulous precision. This tightly controlled oversight of this play is the play’s main strength as it helps the audience to understand this unique concept.

A tight-knit band of boarding school students (from left: Rex Daugherty, Alex Mills, Jefferson Farber, and Joel David Santner) uncover a secret copy of the banned play 'Romeo and Juliet.' Photo by Teresa Wood.
A tight-knit band of boarding school students (from left: Rex Daugherty, Alex Mills, Jefferson Farber, and Joel David Santner) uncover a secret copy of the banned play ‘Romeo and Juliet.’ Photo by Teresa Wood.

The four actors employed here certainly highlight this adaptation’s assets with their beautifully  nuanced recitation and their physical presence. All four actors have to possess vigorous endurance, physical stamina, and strong vocal projection with all the physical interaction in this piece because at times the production is like a marathon race as the actors recite their lines and run around the stage.

Rex Daugherty, Jefferson Farber, Alex Mills, and Joel David Santner are all superb and their resumes in the program attest to their vast backgrounds and training.  Santner’s soliloquy at the opening of Act Two stands out as particularly effective and moving.

Calarco’s control of his technical team is indisputably top-notch as all technical components are stellar. The spare yet elegant scenic design of wood tones and panels by Scenic Designer James Kronzer are a very good choice to contrast with all the physical movement on stage. Stimulating and evocative effects such as a sudden rainstorm, a red sash, fog and vapor wafting from the heavens and an absolutely breathtaking  lit candle border lowered from the ceiling show the endless ingenuity of Kronzer. The Lighting Design by Chris Lee is well-chosen throughout. Musical elements and interludes are very effectively interwoven at apt points in the action courtesy of Sound Designer Matt Rowe and Composer Gabriel Mangiante.

If you want to experience a unique and imaginative rendering of Romeo and Juliet and enjoy theatrical experimentation, do not miss Joe Calarco’s exciting Shakespeare’s R&J.

Two students (Alex Mills, left, and Jefferson Farber) share a tender moment during their reenactment of 'Romeo and Juliet' in 'Shakespeare’s R&J.' Photo by Teresa Wood.
Two students (Alex Mills, left, and Jefferson Farber) share a tender moment during their reenactment of ‘Romeo and Juliet’ in ‘Shakespeare’s R&J.’ Photo by Teresa Wood.

Running Time: Two hours, including a 15-minute intermission.

Shakespeare’s R&J plays through March 3, 2013 in the MAX Theatre at Signature Theatre – 4200 Campbell Avenue, in Arlington, Virginia. For tickets, call the box office (703) 820-9771, or purchase them online.


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David Friscic
David has always had a passionate interest in the arts from acting in professional dinner theatre and community theatre to reviewing film and local theatre in college to making numerous treks to New York City to indulge his interest in live theatre. An enthusiastic interest in writing has shown itself in a BA in English/Education and an MA in English Literature. Taken together, these two interests have culminated in the logical conclusion of writing for an arts blog. David moved up and down the East Coast due to his father's job at General Electric and this has helped him to perceive the world in a very open way. After his schooling, David taught in Catholic school systems for awhile and, then, spent three years in the seminary with two years at Catholic University studying Theology and one year in a practicuum working at a church in New York State. David currently works at the National Science Foundation as a Technical Information Specialist for the Office of Polar Programs and has had the great opportunity to go to Antarctica twice and Greenland once in support of the research community. He enjoys living in Bethesda and has taken courses at the Writer's Center. David enjoys swimming, traveling, reading, and working on committees at his condo. His major interest, however, is the arts and all it encompasses---from symphony, to film, to museum treks to live theatre. He counts having lunch with Lillian Gish and meeting Lily Tomlin, Geraldine Page, Maureen Stapleton, Liza Minnelli and Sandy Dennis as some of the more exciting encounters of his life.