Here is Today’s ‘Page-to-Stage’ Festival Schedule for Monday, September 2, 2013 at The Kennedy Center

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Here is the schedule for TODAY, Monday, September 2, 2013
at the ‘Page-to-Stage’ Festival’:
Performances are from 11 AM until 9:30 PM

The-Kennedy-Center-Page-to-Stage-Festival

At The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts -2700 F Street, NW, in  Washington, DC
Page-to-Stage is FREE!
No tickets are needed.
Seating is on a first-come basis.
Doors open 30 minutes before the start of each performance.
Paid parking is available in the building.
Free shuttle from The Foggy Bottom Metro. 
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MILLENNIUM STAGE NORTH
11 AM-3 PM
The Inkwell: Plays in Progress 
An afternoon of Inklings and an Inkwell showcase. The afternoon of Inklings will include six 10 minute readings of local playwrights works in development with The Inkwell including plays by Danielle Mohlman, Noelle Vinas, Kitty Felde, Rick Massamo, Jason Wells, and Gina Fierra. The Inkwell Showcase will include two 20 minute readings of plays further along in the Inkwell’s development process. These plays include Gwydion Sulieban’s The Great Dismal and a new musical by Krista Knight titled Salamander LeviathanRecommended for ages 13 and up.
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TERRACE GALLERY
1 PM–2 PM
Bowie State University 
A Mile in My Shoes 
[FAMILY FRIENDLY]
by Jennifer L. Nelson
A Mile in My Shoes is a series of linked original playlets that illuminate moments in the lives of families from various backgrounds. An ensemble employs a wide variety of shoes to bring to life humorous and touching stories resonant for children and parents.
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SOUTH ATRIUM FOYER
1 PM–2:30 PM
Baltimore Playwrights Festival 
A showcase of summer productions including: Countdown to the Happy Day by Thomas W. Stephens, When The Letter Writers Have All Died by Tricia Schwaab, Sick Stories, Gentle Granddaddy by S. Ann Johnson, and The Rainbow Plays by Rich Espey. Recommended for ages 13 and up.
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by Thomas W. Stephens
A two-character drama that depicts the unlikely involvement of Gertie, 30s/40s and a self-inflicted street person; and Cervin, a hulking 15-year-old. From their initial encounter on a nighttime city street, the two are chary of each other and emotionally combustible. Gertie, a troubled Army vet, resists being drawn into the world of Cervin, a seventh-grade dropout. Their relationship, nonetheless, grows ever more overlaid, complex, and inevitable.
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When The Letter Writers Have All Died
by Tricia Schwaab
Lori comes to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial to connect with the father she never met and to be alone in the presence of others. She meets Andrew, a college student doing research for a paper. When he tries to strike up a conversation, Lori appears to be uninterested in being friends with him. But Andrew persists and Lori finds herself looking forward to spending time with him. As their friendship develops, Andrew discovers Lori’s secret, and he’s troubled by what he learns. He’s not sure he can bear losing Lori, whom he cares about, so soon after meeting her. Andrew decides to share his own battle with depression in order to save Lori from her inner demons. Interwoven with the stories of others who visit the wall, Lori and Andrew’s story is about finding their individual paths to healing.
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Sick Stories, Gentle Granddaddy
by S. Ann Johnson
Little Miss Mabelle would describe her maternal grandfather as a sweet old man who makes her laugh and spoils her rotten. So the sick stories her family members share about him must be figments of their imagination, right? Wrong. In Sick Stories, Gentle Granddaddy, the drunken past conflicts with the docile present of a husband, father, and gentle granddaddy.
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The Rainbow Plays
by Rich Espey
The rainbow flag that symbolizes gay pride and the gay rights movement was created more than 30 years ago. In its current version, the flag consists of six horizontal stripes, each of which has a symbolic meaning: red (life), orange (healing), yellow (sunshine), green (nature), blue (harmony), and purple (spirit). The first six plays in this collection address one of those themes; while the seventh play incorporates them all into one.
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 THEATER LAB
1 PM–2:30 PM
Federal Theatre Project .
The Inaugural Election for President of Mrs. Jacobson’s Sixth Grade Class 
[FAMILY FRIENDLY]
by Kevin Finkelstein
An allegory on America’s presidential elections, this reading tells the story of Mrs. Jacobson’s sixth grade class. When the class’ hamster dies, Mrs. Jacobson decides to hold an election for class president. Six candidates pledge, but only one can win. Comedy.
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 REHEARSAL ROOM #1
1 PM–5:30 PM
ABG Playwrights 
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1 PM–3:30 PM 
Time of the Troubles
by Kitty Felde
Why does brother turn against brother, almost overnight? That’s the question that haunts the characters of Time of the Troubles. The play is set at Christmastime, in a poor parish on the outskirts of Dandora, on the eve of the bloody 2007 elections. But it’s as much a story about the LA riots and how the violence haunts a pair of cops who were stranded in South Central as the violence erupted. Drama. Recommended for ages 13 and up.
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3:45 PM–5:30 PM 
Bethesda
by Jennie Berman Eng
Diplomat Barry and his family have recently returned to Washington, D.C., after a mysterious scandal abroad. Wife Joy tries to work her networking magic and reinstate Barry as quickly as possible. She’s also pulled strings and secured the kids into prestigious Sidwell Friends School. But Barry is dragging his feet, and seems unwilling to try to get his job back. The kids, too, are suffering both from their parents’ fighting, and from the emotional wounds of their recent past in Bolivia, including Kevin’s discovery that his father was involved with their maid. When Kevin finds out his sister Hildy is cheating on her boyfriend back in La Paz with an American, he runs away. The family tracks him down to the airport, where he’s trying to return to La Paz, and all of the past and its secrets come to head in a violent clash between father and son. Drama. Recommended for ages 13 and up.
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NORTH ATRIUM FOYER
2 PM–5 PM
City Theatre Group
The Great Ascent
by David L. McWellan
An explosion in Hyde Park, in which two people have been killed brings British Intelligence to investigate the action. A social-political thriller that explores prejudice and misunderstanding. Drama. Recommended for ages 13 and up.
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TERRACE GALLERY
2:30 PM–5:30 PM
First Draft
Hinged
by Sarah Sorkin
In 1570, Queen Elizabeth’s ailing court painter, Levina Terling, is under pressure not to let the secrets of her portrait techniques die with her. An up-and-coming rival senses an opportunity and plants his apprentice to find out the secrets. 440 years later, art historian Lorna Buckley strives to rescue Levina Terling from historical obscurity and set the record straight. Can she overcome four centuries of male-dominated opinions or has nothing really changed since 1570? Drama. Recommended for ages 13 and up.
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 AFRICAN LOUNGE
2:30 PM–5:30 PM
Guillotine Theater 
Civilizing Lusby
by John Morogiello
Two businessmen try to make a killing on a railroad venture during the Gilded Age. But when they condemn a Chesapeake waterman’s shack to make way for the track, will the waterman opt to make a killing of his own? Drama. Recommended for ages 13 and up.
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NORTH OPERA TIER LOUNGE
2:30 PM–5:30 PM
Pinky Swear Productions 
The Last Burlesque
by Stephen Spotswood
Darcy was raised by fire-eaters, contortionists, and clowns. It’s only natural she’d fall for a woman who pierces her body with hooks, dangles from the ceiling, and disrobes for an audience. Burlesque, sideshow. Drama. Recommended for mature audiences.
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 FAMILY THEATER
3 PM–5 PM
African Continuum Theatre Company
Mon Chaton
by Thembi Duncan
Summer, 1926. A country schoolteacher inherits a Harlem boarding house from her worldly, sophisticated aunt and finds herself caught in a whirlwind of enthralling characters and events that teach her more about herself than ever imagined. Mon Chaton is one of the untold stories of lesbians and gays during the period that came to be known as the Harlem Renaissance. Drama. Recommended for ages 13 and up
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REHEARSAL ROOM #2
3 PM–5 PM
The Essential Theatre  
The Music of Nina Simone
by Robert Neblett and David Grapes
Music arrangements by Vince Dimura
An electric new musical revue celebrating Jazz icon Nina Simone. Child prodigy, jazz superstar, civil rights activist, political exile, Nina Simone was all of these things and more. One of the true divas of the 20th century and a genuine musical powerhouse, she defined a generation and defied classification. Silky, soulful, and a jazz powerhouse, this musical tribute provides a celebrated exploration long overdue. Biography/Musical. Recommended for ages 13 and up.
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SOUTH ATRIUM FOYER
3 PM– 6 PM
Strand Theater Company
House Beautiful
by Liz Maestri
In a decaying town, one lone house still stands. Inside, three generations of a family weather the end of an era. Drama. Recommended for ages 13 and up.
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MILLENNIUM STAGE SOUTH
6 PM–7 PM.
Synetic Theater
The Picture of Dorian Gray
A text-and-movement interpretation of Oscar Wilde’s classic. Fearing the ravages of time and realizing the impermanence of youth, Dorian Gray makes a fateful wish–that his almost supernaturally lifelike portrait grow old while he remains forever young and beautiful. Synetic inventiveness and unforgettable visuals will elevate Oscar Wilde’s fantastical story to yet another level. Movement/Drama.
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TERRACE GALLERY
7:30 PM–9 PM
The Washington Rogues
The Campsite Rule
by Alexandra Petri
Popular sex columnist Dan Savage’s campsite rule states that the one guideline for May to December romance is: leave your younger partner better than you found him. With humanity and wit, The Campsite Rule charts the course of 20-something professional Susan and college freshman Lincoln’s unlikely relationship. Between their friends’ disapproval, Susan’s other hookups, and the chaos of life in general, the duo face challenges on the road to romance. Alexandra Petri’s sexy new comedy “The Campsite Rule” asks: what is normal and when can you tell you’ve grown up? Comedy. Recommended for mature audiences.
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 MILLENNIUM STAGE NORTH
7:30 PM–10:30 PM
Baltimore Rock Opera Society (BROS) .
Gründlehämmer
With the aid of the Royal Guard, Lothario has oppressed his citizens, confiscated the powerful instruments that gave voice to their music, and formed an alliance with an immortal cave-dwelling monster, the Gründle. While most Brojans live their lives in fear, an innocent young boy of great talent is coming of age in a tiny hamlet on the outskirts of the Kingdom. His tremendous skills on the guitar bring hope to the tiny farming village and spark the flames of resistance in those that can still remember true Rock. Will this young boy cast off his innocence to claim the Gründlehämmer? Will the Dark King release his iron grip on the lifeblood of Brotopia? Join the Brojans in their struggle to reclaim the power of Rock n’ Roll. Rock Opera. Recommended for ages 13 and up.
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FAMILY THEATER
7:30 PM–10 PM
Flying V 
The Pirate Laureate and the King of the Sea
by Zachary Fernebok
Heyo! In a world where words cut deeper than swards, there are no greater pirates sailing the deep than Captain Grayscale and his Pirate Laureate Finn. They best be careful. Their names are becoming known ocean wide and with their new found fame, they may find themselves in a sinister sights of the one man wrecking crew of the Ocean Ephrata – Rey Del Mar, King of the Sea.Comedy/Adventure.
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TERRACE THEATER
7:30 PM–10:30 PM
The Playwrights Forum in association with LCTM Enterprises .
Welcome to the Land of Bad Choices
by James H. Hanrahan and Harry M. Bagdasian
A school security guard and two soldiers with PTSD carry guns to school on this day. No one set out to be the bad guy, but there’s shooting. Two of the men are injured and a child is dead. Welcome to the land of bad choices. Drama. Recommended
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THEATER LAB
7:30 PM–9:30 PM
Theater J  
Our Suburb
by Darrah Cloud
for mature audiences.

Directed by Tony Award–winning actress and Broadway director Judith Ivey.

An homage to Our Town, this world premiere invites audiences to suburban Illinois in 1977, when the Nazis marched on Skokie. Amidst holiday planning, interfaith teenage relationships, and a growing dark menace–life and love happen. Drama. Recommended for ages 13 and up.

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SOUTH ATRIUM FOYER
7:30 PM–9:30 PM
The Welders  
Greatest Hits
The Welders, a DC-area playwrights’ collective whose mission is to establish an organically evolving, alternative platform for play development and production, will present a reading of the best short works from throughout its members’ career. The Welders: Renee Calarco, Allyson Currin, Caleen Sinnette Jennings, Bob Bartlett, and Gwydion Suilebhan. Recommended for ages 13 and up.

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NORTH ATRIUM FOYER
7:30 PM–9:30 PM
The Playwrights Gymnasium
An Ordinary Afternoon
by Mary Watters
A woman is finally forced to confront a terrible problem that she’s turned a blind eye to for years. Her husband’s actions trigger series of events and the woman’s carefully managed life begins to unravel when strangers intrude on her comfortable world. Drama. Recommended for mature audiences.
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REHEARSAL ROOM #1
7:30 PM– 9 PM
Washington Improv Theater 
iMusical: Uncovered
iMusical: Uncovered is an improvised musical that discovers the songs underneath the cover of ordinary life. A single audience suggestion inspires the cast to explore the magic within the human condition, using lyrics, music and scenes created instantly “on the spot.” Musical Theater. Recommended for ages 13 and up.
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REHEARSAL ROOM #2
7:30 PM -9:30PM
force/collision
Separate Rooms
by Joe Calarco
force/collision presents a work-in-progress reading of playwright Joe Calarco’s new play Separate Rooms. Sex, death, booze and a mysterious woman in the closet as friends and lovers unite during a wake in a New York City apartment. Cast includes Tracy Olivera, Kimberly Gilbert, Thomas Keegan, Jenna Sokolowski, Evan Casey, and Tim Getman. Comedy. Recommended for ages 13 and up.
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 REHEARSAL ROOM #3
7:30 PM–9:30 PM
Scena 
 Sabateur!
Drama. Recommended for mature audiences.
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The performance is free and open to the public, and will be streamed live on the Kennedy Center website.
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The-Kennedy-Center-Page-to-Stage-Festival

THE ENTIRE SCHEDULE FOR THE 2013 PAGE-TO-STAGE FESTIVAL.

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Joel Markowitz is the Publisher and Editor of DCMetroTheaterArts. He founded the site with his brother Bruce to help promote the vast riches of theatre and the arts in the DC Metro area that includes Maryland, Virginia, and DC theater and music venues, universities, schools, Children's theaters, professional, and community theatres. Joel is an advocate for promoting the 'stars of the future' in his popular 'Scene Stealers' articles. He wrote a column for 5 years called ‘Theatre Schmooze’ and recorded podcast interviews for DC Theatre Scene. His work can also be seen and read on BroadwayStars. Joel also wrote a monthly preview of what was about to open in DC area theatres for BroadwayWorld. He is an avid film and theater goer, and a suffering Buffalo Bills and Sabres fan. Joel was a regular guest on 'The Lunch and Judy Show' radio program starring Judy Stadt in NYC. Joel founded The Ushers Theatre Going Group in the DC area in 1990, which had a 25-year run when it took its final curtain call last year. Joel is a proud member of The American Critics Association.