Scene Stealers-Week Ending August 17, 2014

Here are this week’s Scene Stealers. Congrats to our honorees!

_______

Stacy Crickmer as Lady of the Lake singing ‘Diva’s Lament’ and “Find Your Grail’ in Monty Python’s Spamalot at Zemfira Stage

Stacy Crickmer (Lady of the Lake). Photo by Zina Beck.

Stacy Crickmer (Lady of the Lake). Photo by Zina Beck.

“Songs and scenes that caught your reviewer’s eyes and ears for mention included: Crickmer lamenting her lack of appropriate stage time with “Diva’s Lament” (Whatever Happened To My Part?)”, and her work in the number “Find Your Grail…Next add Stacy Crickmer as the Lady of the Lake. She possesses a clear, strong  belting voice delivered with appropriate “big” moves over-emphasizing all meaning as it is meant to be done.”-David Siegel.

______

Priscilla Cuellar, John Loughney, Jaclyn Young, and Matthew “Moose” Thompson Singing “Unlikely Lovers” at The Elden Street Musical Experience at NextStop Theatre Company

From L to R: Jaclyn Young,  John Loughney. Matthew "Moose" Thompson, and Priscilla Cuellar.

From L to R: Jaclyn Young, John Loughney, Matthew “Moose” Thompson, and Priscilla Cuellar.

“The high point of the evening, however, for me, was “Unlikely Lovers” from Falsettos, the only sad song in the entire program. Filled with pathos and using all four voices, it was hauntingly beautiful.”-Solomon Stone Romney.

______

Jaki Demarest as Lady Macbeth in the Sleepwalking Scene (Act V Scene I) in Macbeth: The Instruments of Darkness at The Rude Mechanicals

Alan Duda (Macbeth) and Jaki Demarest (Lady Macbeth). Photo by  Jae Robinson.

Alan Duda (Macbeth) and Jaki Demarest (Lady Macbeth). Photo by Jae Robinson.

Blindfolded during the performance, Jaki Demarest did a wonderful job of embracing the darkness in her portrayal of Lady Macbeth. She was incredibly comfortable in her own skin and made great active choices in interpreting the physicality of the character. Her energy never lagged and despite not being able to see her surroundings, she maintained great chemistry with [Alan] Duda. Demarest was at her best while writhing in the cold-hearted plotting of King Duncan’s murder and later during the famous “Sleepwalking Scene’:

Out, damned spot! out, I say!—One: two: why,
  then, ’tis time to do’t.—Hell is murky!—Fie, my
  lord, fie! a soldier, and afeard? What need we
  fear who knows it, when none can call our power
 to account?—Yet who would have thought the old
  man to have had so much blood in him?
______

Séamus Miller as Fiver in the last scene of Pol Pot & Associates, LLP  at Longacre Lea

Séamus Miller in 'Pol Pot & Associates, LLP.' Photograph by Kathleen Akerley.

Séamus Miller in ‘Pol Pot & Associates, LLP.’ Photograph by Kathleen Akerley.

“Kathleen Akerley’s brilliant new play at Longacre Lea is about six refugees from a law firm who establish a commune at a remote retreat. At the firm, Fiver was lowest on the ladder: he operated the photocopier and may be “special needs” (though he’s way too wise to be). Fiver reads people’s Tarot cards and functions in the story line as guileless threat to no one. In Seamus Miller’s sensitive portrayal of the role, Fiver’s card in a fictive Tarot deck would be The Naïf. Miller gently sustains our attention throughout, but never more compellingly than in the last scene, when all six of the men have arrived at the retreat, about to move in (it’s a flashback). Each speaks of what “home” meant to them. Then comes Fiver’s turn. He begins, “When I was little I didn’t know if my home was just my bed, or my bed and the whole room around it with all the toys, or the excited feeling in my stomach every time I walked out of the room down the hall into the rest of the house…”  Miller performs the speech with such deep and tremulous passion that immediately it’s as if he is alone on stage and owns it—no mean achievement in a cast as superb as this one.”-John Stoltenberg.

______

 Andrew Worthington in The Universal Language, in All in the Timing, at The Heritage Players

Emily Lambert (Dawn)  and Andrew Worthington (Don) in 'Universal Language' in All in the Timing at The Heritage Playes. Photo Courtesy of Joshua McKerrow.

Emily Lambert (Dawn) and Andrew Worthington (Don) in ‘Universal Language’ in All in the Timing at The Heritage Playes. Photo Courtesy of Joshua McKerrow.

“Andrew Worthington gave a first-rate performance – a Scene Stealer whenever he takes the stage, a standout in All in the Timing. Andrew took the stage he brought a unique and welcome presence, but no time did he steal a scene more than his performance in The Universal Language, in which he actually spoke mostly gibberish. Worthington’s comic timing was spot on; his chemistry with The Heritage Players(Dawn) was simply captivating, and created not only a wonderful playfulness, but made the audience deeply invested in the scene’s outcome. A natural, gifted, and wonderfully funny actor, you’d be remiss to skip out on Andrew Worthington’s performances this weekend.”-Brennan Jones.

______

LINKS

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 8/9/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 8/2/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 7/5/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 6/28/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 6/21/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 6/13/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 6/06/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 5/29/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 5/22/14.

Capital Fringe Scene Stealers Part 1 and Part 2.


, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.