DCMTA Scene Stealers-January and February 2015-Part 2

Here is our second group of January and February Scene Stealers. Congrats to our honorees.

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Patrick A’Hearn Singing “Music of the Night” at The Music of Andrew Lloyd Webber at Riverside Center Dinner Theater

Patrick A'Hearn.
Patrick A’Hearn.

“But the loudest applause was heard after A’Hearn appeared from his lair to captivate the audience with his glorious performance of ‘Music in the Night.” It was a tour de force and it was followed by thunderous applause and ‘Bravos!’ I could go on and on about how A’Hearn stopped the show but all I will say is that it’s worth the price of admission to come and hear him perform this Webber classic.”-Joel Markowitz

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Sara Barker as Desdemona Reacting to Her Husband in Othello in at WSC Avant Bard 

Sara Barker (Desdemona) and Chuck Young (Othello). Photo by C. Stanley Photography.
Sara Barker (Desdemona) and Chuck Young (Othello). Photo by C. Stanley Photography.

“T.S. Eliot’s poem “The Hollow Men” is sometimes said to be about the shell-shocked soldiers of the First World War. (“We are the hollow men/We are the stuffed men/ Leaning together /Headpiece filled with straw.”) In a time when there are homeless veterans, WSC Avant Bard’s Othello provided a real service, highlighting the suffering of military men and women as they attempt to adjust to life at home. Sara Barker’s Desdemona was breath-taking, as she desperately clung to the one real thing in her world, her love for Othello. Her shock when Othello struck her was a classic scene stealer; capturing the precise moment when a romantic experience turns dark and frightening.”-Sophia Howes.

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Paul-Emile Cendron as Mortimer ‘Loses It’ in Mary Stuart at The Folger Theatre

Paul-Emile Cendron (Mortimer) in Folger Theatre's 'Mary Stuart.' Photo by Teresa Wood.
Paul-Emile Cendron (Mortimer) in Folger Theatre’s ‘Mary Stuart.’ Photo by Teresa Wood.

“Schiller’s Mary Stuart, produced at The Folger, features two magnificent queens, Mary and Elizabeth I. It is one of those rare productions in which every element shines like a beautifully polished jewel. Paul-Emile Cendron plays Mortimer, the exemplar of all the open-faced, idealistic young men who flocked to Mary’s cause and ended up dead. The scene in which he loses touch with reality stands out for sheer bravery and conviction. Here, Paul-Emile Cendron is a first-rate scene stealer, displaying with great intensity a combination of deep emotion, fear, and rage. If you get the chance, don’t miss this stunning production, which runs through this Sunday, March 8th.”-Sophia Howes 

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Parker Drown as Andrew Singing “What’s the Point?”in Kid Victory

L to R: Sarah Litzsinger (Emily), Jake Winn (Luke), and Parker Drown (Ensemble) in Kid Victory at Signature Theatre. Photo by Margot Schulman.
L to R: Sarah Litzsinger (Emily), Jake Winn (Luke), and Parker Drown (Ensemble) in ‘Kid Victory’ at Signature Theatre. Photo by Margot Schulman.

“There’s a wonderful scene in Kid Victory when 17-year-old Luke—still recovering from a horrific year during which he was abused by an older sexual predator—meets up in the woods with an age mate named Andrew whom he found on an online gay dating site. Luke is beyond shy; he is troubled and withdrawn, longing for a sexual connection, or at least a friendship, yet still held captive by his memories of the harm that was done to him. Andrew, on the other hand, is positively buoyant and effervescent with reach-out-and-touch-someone encouragement, and he sings a perky, perk-up song, “What’s the Point?” that is meant for Luke but also sends a zinger of a message to us all. As such it is heartstirring and showstopping. Also doesn’t hurt that Parker Drown sings it while demonstrating mad tap-dancing chops. (Wait, this is the woods. How can someone tap-dance in the woods?! Oh, never mind, go with it. This guy’s performance is awesome.)”-John Stoltenberg

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Alan Duda  as Caesar Appears to Brutus in Julius Caesar at The Rude Mechanicals

Alan Duda (Julius Caesar). Photo by Trevor Jones and Leanne OíNeill.
Alan Duda (Julius Caesar). Photo by Trevor Jones and Leanne OíNeill.

“The Rude Mechanicals had a unique take on Julius Caesar; he was just like (wait for it) Lenin! In this iteration, Brutus became Trotsky and Octavius, a young Stalin. The production was an alternate history, set in 20th century Rome with echoes of the Soviet Union after the revolution. The crowd, i.e. the Roman populace, sat in the front seats and yelled its head off for Caesar or Brutus, depending on who was agitating and why. Caesar (Alan Duda) came across as a somewhat courtly mob boss, surrounded by adoring women. The scene stealer in this production was Alan Duda, whose evil scream as Caesar when he appears to Brutus was truly terrifying. For being (almost) as scary as the real Caesar, Alan Duda, you are Julius Caesar’s scene-stealer.”-Sophia Howes.

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Maureen R. Goldman as Aggie Wheeler Reveals ‘The Real Aggie’ in The Game’s Afoot at the Little Theatre of Alexandria

Maureen R. Goldman as Angie Wheeler. Photo by Matt Liptak.
Maureen R. Goldman as Aggie Wheeler. Photo by Matt Liptak.

“Director Frank Pasqualino turned Ken Ludwig’s deft farce, The Game’s Afoot, into an evening of wicked fun, where behind every door was a body and behind every innocent face was a killer just waiting to strike. As Aggie Wheeler, Maureen R. Goldman resembled a young Sarah Jessica Parker. She enacted her character with astuteness and charm, roaming around the stage with a gentle and misleading bewilderment. Her transformation as her true nature was revealed was just perfect; a scene stealer which reminds us just how important character is to comedy.”-Sophia Howes

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Sarah Litzsinger as Emily Singing “People Like Us” in Kid Victory at Signature Theatre.

Sarah Litzsinger (Emily). iPhoto by Margot Schulman.
Sarah Litzsinger (Emily). iPhoto by Margot Schulman.

Sarah Litzsinger as Emily is also a scene-stealer. As a quirky storeowner who befriends Luke, her slightly offbeat nature was accentuated in upbeat, quirky tunes like “Lawn,” where she shares how her lawn as a child growing up was her comfort as she hid from the world of bullies who would tease her for her differences. In a touching moment, Emily performs “People Like Us,” where she identifies with Luke’s experience as an outcast in an effort to ease him.”-Derek Mong

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Chita Rivera Singing “Class” at A Legendary Celebration at The Alden

Chita Rivera. Photo by Laura Marie Duncan.
Chita Rivera. Photo by Laura Marie Duncan.

“Reminiscing about playing Velma in the original Broadway production of Chicago alongside of Gwen Verdon’s Roxie, Chita ended her show on a high note, singing both roles in “Nowadays,” featuring a spot-on impersonation of Verdon, and the iconic “All that Jazz,” a song that Ms. River remembered adoring from first hearing the well-known first few bars during a tryout rehearsal in Philadelphia.”-Douglas Lloyd

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Todd Scofield (Sir William Davison) and Holly Twyford (Queen Elizabeth). Photo by Teresa Wood.
Todd Scofield (Sir William Davison) and Holly Twyford (Queen Elizabeth). Photo by Teresa Wood.

Todd Scofield as Sir William Davidson Knows His Fate Is Sealed in Mary Stuart at The Folger Theatre

“There is a “minor” character who has a critical role in the Folger’s recent production of Mary Stuart. With only a few moments of visibility Todd Scofield as Sir William Davidson steals a scene with wonderful precision.

As Mary Stuart moves to its climax, Scofield’s character Davison is up against the imposing presence of Queen Elizabeth (played by Holly Twyford) demanding deniability for what she has done; signed the death warrant for Mary Stuart, Queen of Scotland (played by Kate Eastwood).

As the evercautious Davison, Todd Scofield clearly projects the undesired weight of his heavy burden. His feet are of clay. The death warrant is a hot heavy coal in his hand. He is not in a place he wants to be. His voice plaintive and questioning. Holding on to Mary Stuart’s death warrants he literally “sweats” before our eyes. He mumbles to himself as he contemplates the sure consequences of any action he takes. He mutters something similar to “If I had know what was expected of me, I never would have taken this job.”

Scofield’s non-actions bring fire to the Twyford’s eyes, yet I couldn’t take my eyes off of Todd Scofield for his acting chops. He projected the mess he was in with an emotional and physical resonance.

There were no exits for him. He knew he was going to be a loser, no matter what. He was no dithering old fool. To use local DC area parlance, he was an SES in deep trouble having not gauged what it means to work directly for a political appointee who would do him in.”-David Siegel

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Gary Sullivan as McCrankie Singin’ “My Name it is McCrankie” in Haddon Hall at The Victoria Lyric Opera Company

Gary Sullivan as McCrankie. Photo by Harvey Levine.
Gary Sullivan as McCrankie. Photo by Harvey Levine.

Gary Sullivan recieved the loudest applause for his rollicking “My name it is McCrankie.” And when he joined Stuart in “Theres no one by” and then the lively Amanda Jones (Dorcas) in the toe-tappin’ “Hoity-Toity, what’s a kiss”- it was bliss! And the audience went gaga when he did a jig with the chorus at the end of the final Act called “Hech mon! Hech Mon!”-Joel Markowitz

LINKS:

DCMTA Scene Stealers-January and February 2015-Part 1.

In the Moment: A Tip of the Hat to Mary Stuart’s Todd Scofield by David Siegel.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week Ending 11/27/14-Part 1.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week Ending 11/27/14-Part 2.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week Ending 11/7/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week Ending 10/24/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week Ending 10/12/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 9/28/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 9/18/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 9/11/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 9/1/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 8/24/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 8/17/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 8/9/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 8/2/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 7/5/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week- Week Ending 6/28/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 6/21/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 6/13/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 6/06/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 5/29/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 5/22/14.

Capital Fringe Scene Stealers Part 1 and Part 2.

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Joel Markowitz
Joel Markowitz is the Publisher and Editor of DCMetroTheaterArts. He founded the site with his brother Bruce to help promote the vast riches of theatre and the arts in the DC Metro area that includes Maryland, Virginia, and DC theater and music venues, universities, schools, Children's theaters, professional, and community theatres. Joel is an advocate for promoting the 'stars of the future' in his popular 'Scene Stealers' articles. He wrote a column for 5 years called ‘Theatre Schmooze’ and recorded podcast interviews for DC Theatre Scene. His work can also be seen and read on BroadwayStars. Joel also wrote a monthly preview of what was about to open in DC area theatres for BroadwayWorld. He is an avid film and theater goer, and a suffering Buffalo Bills and Sabres fan. Joel was a regular guest on 'The Lunch and Judy Show' radio program starring Judy Stadt in NYC. Joel founded The Ushers Theatre Going Group in the DC area in 1990, which had a 25-year run when it took its final curtain call last year. Joel is a proud member of The American Critics Association.