DCMTA Scene Stealers-Week Ending March 31, 2015 Part 1

0
5

Here is Part 1 of our favorite ‘Scene Stealers’ in March 2015. Congrats to our honorees!

______

Alex Alburqueque, as Leporello, in Don Giovanni at The In Series singing “Lovely Lady”

L to R: Alex Alburquequqe and Andrew Pardini.  Photo by Imran Peerzada.
L to R: Alex Alburquequqe (Leporello) and Andrew Pardini. (Don Giovanni). Photo by Imran Peerzada.

“Don Giovanni would be nothing without his sidekick, Leporello. The In Series sets this Mozart classic in the American bible belt during a tent revival. In a night of highlights, one singer stood out as the comic relief and conscience of the piece. Alex Alburqueque acts with his entire body – mining every moment for hidden comedy or pathos. He especially shines on his aria “Lovely Lady,” thriving on the tricky arpeggios that Mozart is so fond of.”-Jessica Vaughan.

______

Lisa Anne Bailey, as Sister Aloysius, Finally Having Her Own Doubts in Doubt: A Parable at City of Fairfax Theatre Company

Lisa Anne Bailey (Sister Aloysius). Photo courtesy of City of Fairfax Theatre Company.
Lisa Anne Bailey (Sister Aloysius). Photo courtesy of City of Fairfax Theatre Company.
“As Sister Aloysius Lisa Anne Bailey is principal of a Catholic grade school on the grounds of the church. She finds reason to distrust the church’s priest, Father Flynn. Aloysius is rule-bound, and full of conviction, and her righteousness is ruthless. Bailey executes the severity of Sister Aloysius with a zeal, but at the end of the play, she reveals startlingly that she has her own doubt and the audience is left to wonder what she doubts and how deeply are the roots of her belief shattered. The actress brings the audience perfectly to these important questions, and we can’t help but leave the theater asking these questions of our own doubts and beliefs.”-Chuck Leonard 
______
Chuck DLuhy, as Michael Novak, Has Had Enough in God of Carnage at The Little Theatre of Alexandria
Chuck Dluhy (Michael Novak) and Karen Shotts (Veronica Novak). Photo by Keith Waters.
Chuck Dluhy (Michael Novak) and Karen Shotts (Veronica Novak). Photo by Keith Waters.
 “Two sets of parents are meeting to deal with the The production is full of wonderful acting, but one moment seared into my brain is when Michael, played by Chuck Dluhy, is reminded one too many times about how he was cruel to his child’s pet hamster. Dluhy’s screamed response is cathartic, over-the-top, and entirely right for Michael. The subtle build of tension is beautiful and when the explosion happens, the audience is reminded of people who get this upset.”-Chuck Leonard
 _____

John Loughney, as Archibald Craven, and Bobby Libby, as Dr. Neville Craven, Singing ‘Lily’s Eyes’ in The Secret Garden at NextStop Theatre Company

John Loughney  (Archibald Craven) and Bobby Libby (Dr. Neville Crave) in ‘The Secret Garden.’ Photo by Traci J. Brooks Studios.
John Loughney (Archibald Craven) and Bobby Libby (Dr. Neville Crave) in ‘The Secret Garden.’ Photo by Traci J. Brooks Studios.

“Just as the test of an Irish pub is the billowy Guinness pour or an Indian curry is judged on its layered onion base, productions of The Secret Garden are judged by the soaring, first-act male duet, “Lily’s Eyes.” Like Bizet’s “The Pearl Fishers’ Duet” or even hot and cold taps fusing into one stream, this number pours out in glorious tenor and baritone tones — two brothers captivated by the same dearly departed woman.

John Loughney’s afflicted Archie is endlessly satisfying. (As a prelude to “Lily’s Eyes,” he slayed with the aria “A Bit of Earth,” and I was reduced to just another weeping willow.) His singing is like a stairway to heaven, shedding every earthly burden and flaw – pure, bright, astonishing, nourishing.

Archie’s brother, the crafty Dr. Neville Craven, has afflictions that are not as visible – he secretly coveted his sister-in-law and his motives remain murky toward Archie and other inhabitants of Misselthwaite Manor. Groomed like Simon Legree, he seems suspicious. But, oh, how Bobby Libby inhabits him! Every fiber tingles with desire, and it’s all about the baritone.”-Terry Byrne

______

Katie McManus, as Norma Desmond, Singing ‘With One Look’ and “As If We Never Said Goodbye” at Sunset Boulevard at Reston Community Players

Katie McManus as Norma Desmond. Photo by Traci J. Brooks Studio
Katie McManus as Norma Desmond. Photo by Traci J. Brooks Studio

“Norma’s songs, especially the musical’s two showstoppers “With One Look” and “As If We Never Said Goodbye,” require a big voice with range and control…Katie McManus successfully takes on the challenge. Her powerful, soaring voice and expressive face deliver a Norma Desmond that gives the show its foundation.”-Kim Moeller

______
 Shane Moran, as Matt, Has a Big Entrance in Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead at The George Washington University
Shane Moran (Matt) and  Jon Weigell (Charley Brown).
Shane Moran (Matt) and Jon Weigell (Charley Brown).
“When Shane Moran bursts onstage as Matt (the former Peanuts character Pig-Pen reimagined as a germophobe jock), his hilarious horny swagger not only cows CB (the timid nice guy Charlie Brown, played by Jon Weigell) but steals the scene (which is called, apropos Matt’s outrageously sexist obnoxiousness, “It’s the Great Pussy, Charlie Brown”). Within moments, Moran establishes his brazen comic performance as Everydude, complete with cool cruel bravado and dangerous homophobic edge. Moran’s portrayal is as scary-funny as it is spot on.”-John Stoltenberg 

 _______

Tessa More, as Katisha, Singing “For He’s Going to Marry Yum-Yum” at Hot Mikado at Glenelg Country School

L to R: Rhea Malviya (Pooh-Bah), Tessa More (Katisha), Rob Bowman, Marisa Diehl (Yum-Yum), and Director Carole Lehan. Photo by Judy Criller.
L to R: Rhea Malviya (Pooh-Bah), Tessa More (Katisha), Rob Bowman, Marisa Diehl (Yum-Yum), and Director Carole Lehan. Photo by Judy Criller.

“One wonders what Arthur Sullivan would have made of such decorous English ditties as “For He’s Going to Marry Yum-Yum” delivered with the bluesy flair of a nightclub torch singer. This show’s most accomplished vocalist, Tessa More as Katisha, knocks that one out of the ballpark, then turns “Hour of Gladness” and “Alone and Yet Alive” into reward enough for attending.”-John Harding

______

Eric Owens, as The Dutchman, in Washington National Opera’s The Flying Dutchman, singing “Die Frist ist um, und abermals verstrichen” (The time is up, and to Eternity’s tomb consign’d)

Eric Owens as The Dutchman. Photo by Scott Suchman.
Eric Owens as The Dutchman. Photo by Scott Suchman.

“In his role debut, Eric Owens captivated the audience in the opera house with his rendition of the Dutchman’s first tortured aria. He arrives draped and chained to the set and bemoans his curse in a powerful bass-baritone and a perfect union of technical prowess, emotional impact, and sheer vocal power. Nobody does tortured anti-heroes like Wagner and Owens has proven himself a Wagnerian star.”-Jessica Vaughan

______

Cosette Rosales, as Edna Turblad, and Adam Russell, as Wilbur Turnblad, Singing “You’re Timeless to Me’ at Hairspray at Our Lady of Good Counsel High School

Cosette Rosales (Edna Turnblad), and Adam Russell (Wilbur Turnblad). Photo courtesy of Our Lady of Good Counsel High School.
Cosette Rosales (Edna Turnblad), and Adam Russell (Wilbur Turnblad). Photo courtesy of Our Lady of Good Counsel High School.

“Another showstopper comes when two very impressive high school students capture the sweet, albeit off-beat, middle-aged romance of Tracy’s parents…  The role of Edna Turnblad, Tracy’s “larger than life” mother, is typically played by a male actor. However, in this production the ultra-talented female Cosette Rosales plays the part. Adam Russell is appropriately quirky as Tracy’s father, Wilbur Turnblad, the owner of a joke and novelty store. Wilbur is a man of modest means, but he loves and supports his wife and daughter and treats them like royalty. Edna and Wilbur show their love for each other by singing and dancing to a challenging number, “You’re Timeless to Me,” and performing turns and dips with confidence and ease.”-Paul Bessel and Barbara Braswell.

______

Joshua Simon as Tucker Playing a Video Game in ‘Bigger Than You, Bigger Than Me’ at Field Trip Theatre

Joshua Simon (Tucker). Photo by Daniel Corey.
Joshua Simon (Tucker). Photo by Daniel Corey.

“In this subtly paced drama about post 9/11 paranoia (which may be perfectly plausible premonition, who knows?), Joshua Simon plays Tucker, a guy with an important position in the Department of Homeland Security. At home Tucker escapes from his work into video games, which he plays obsessively, as if in a digital mancave, even when talking with his wife, Beth (played by Sophie Schulman). Throughout Simon portrays Tucker in an understated, amusingly nuanced way that is well worth watching from the get-go—he definitely does the dude that playwright Kathryn Coughlin has written.

At one point, lacking a hand to hold a slice of pizza Beth has served him because both his hands are on his joystick, Tucker simply lets the pizza dangle from his mouth while he keeps playing—and suddenly the scene is all about Simon’s comic noshing-gaming business.”-John Stoltenberg 

______

Mia Sterbini, as Motormouth Maybelle, Singing “I Know Where I’ve Been” in Hairspray at Our Lady of Good Counsel High School

Mia Sterbini Singing "I Know Where I've Been."  Photo courtesy of Our Lady of Good Counsel High School.
Mia Sterbini Singing “I Know Where I’ve Been.” Photo courtesy of Our Lady of Good Counsel High School.

“The host of Negro Day on the Corny Collins Show (and also Seaweed’s mother) is the golden-haired Motormouth Maybelle who introduces herself as “Big, Blonde, and Beautiful.” This sweet and sassy adult role is soulfully played by sophomore Mia Sterbini. Later, Sterbini stops the show when Maybelle teaches the young people that, if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again, with the heartfelt “I Know Where I’ve Been.”-Paul Bessel and Barbara Braswell 

______

Paul Tonden, as Max, Singing “New Ways to Dream” in Sunset Boulevard at Reston Community Players

Paul Tonden as Max. Photo by Traci J. Brooks Studios.
Paul Tonden as Max. Photo by Traci J. Brooks Studios.
“Paul Tonden as Max, Norma’s devoted butler, doesn’t talk much but when he does, he commands attention. Tonden conveys the devotion and love underneath the character’s creepy exterior, especially in the second act as he reveals his long history with Norma and reprises “New Ways to Dream.” His rich voice will linger in my memory for some time to come.“-Kim Moeller
______

Ethan Van Slyke, as Colin Craven, and Katie Keyser, as the Ghost of Lily Craven, Singing “Come to My Garden’ in The Secret Garden at NextStop Theatre Company

Katie Keyser (Lily) and Ethan Van Slyke (Colin) in "The Secret Garden."  Photo by Traci J. Brooks Studios.
Katie Keyser (Lily) and Ethan Van Slyke (Colin) in “The Secret Garden.” Photo by Traci J. Brooks Studios.

“The scene stealer on the night I attended, though, was Ethan Van Slyke, as the impudent yet haloed Colin, another “forgotten” bud in need of tending. Comparing him to Haley Joel Osment seeing dead people is irresistible, yet his angelic duet with his mother, “Come to My Garden,” is to die for. Van Slyke simply glows with promise.”-Terry Byrne

______

LINKS:

She’s Ready for Her Close-Up: Meet Katie McManus, Star of Reston Community Players’ ‘Sunset Boulevard.’

New Ways to Dream: Meet Paul Tonden, Star of Reston Community Players’ ‘Sunset Boulevard.’

DCMTA Scene Stealers-January and February 2015-Part 2.

DCMTA Scene Stealers-January and February 2015-Part 1.

In the Moment: A Tip of the Hat to Mary Stuart’s Todd Scofield by David Siegel.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week Ending 11/27/14-Part 1.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week Ending 11/27/14-Part 2.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week Ending 11/7/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week Ending 10/24/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week Ending 10/12/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 9/28/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 9/18/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 9/11/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 9/1/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 8/24/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 8/17/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 8/9/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 8/2/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 7/5/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week- Week Ending 6/28/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 6/21/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 6/13/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 6/06/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 5/29/14.

Top Scene Stealers of the Week-Week Ending 5/22/14.

Capital Fringe Scene Stealers Part 1 and Part 2.

Previous article‘Barefoot in the Park’ Plays at McLean Community Players May 1-16, 2015 by Cathy Farnsworth
Next articleMeet the Cast of ‘August: Osage County’ at The Highwood Theatre Part 5: Shannon Leach
Joel Markowitz
Joel Markowitz is the Publisher and Editor of DCMetroTheaterArts. He founded the site with his brother Bruce to help promote the vast riches of theatre and the arts in the DC Metro area that includes Maryland, Virginia, and DC theater and music venues, universities, schools, Children's theaters, professional, and community theatres. Joel is an advocate for promoting the 'stars of the future' in his popular 'Scene Stealers' articles. He wrote a column for 5 years called ‘Theatre Schmooze’ and recorded podcast interviews for DC Theatre Scene. His work can also be seen and read on BroadwayStars. Joel also wrote a monthly preview of what was about to open in DC area theatres for BroadwayWorld. He is an avid film and theater goer, and a suffering Buffalo Bills and Sabres fan. Joel was a regular guest on 'The Lunch and Judy Show' radio program starring Judy Stadt in NYC. Joel founded The Ushers Theatre Going Group in the DC area in 1990, which had a 25-year run when it took its final curtain call last year. Joel is a proud member of The American Critics Association.