DCMetroTheaterArts’ Summer 2015 Scene Stealers Part 2

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Here is Part 2 of DCMetroTheaterArts’ staff’s Summer 2015 Scene Stealers. Congrats to our honorees.

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Erin Adams as Kate Monster Singing “There’s a A Fine, Fine Line” in Avenue Q at Stillpointe Theatre Initiative

L to R: Christmas Eve (Danielle Robinette) teaches Kate Monster (Erin Adams) about the true meaning of relationships in “The More You Ruv Someone.” Photo courtesy of Stillpointe Theatre Initiative.
L to R: Christmas Eve (Danielle Robinette) teaches Kate Monster (Erin Adams) about the true meaning of relationships in “The More You Ruv Someone.” Photo courtesy of Stillpointe Theatre Initiative.

“With a singing voice that is both sweet and strong, Erin Adams shines as Kate Monster, especially during her rendition of “There’s a Fine, Fine Line.”-Lauren Honeycutt

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Kecia A. Campbell as The Nurse Enters in Romeo and Juliet: Love Knows No Age at the Unexpected Stage Company

Lady Capulet (Dawn Thomas Reidy), Juliet (Claire Schoonover), and Nurse (Kecia A. Campbell). Photo by Lew Lorton/Saul Pleeter.
Lady Capulet (Dawn Thomas Reidy), Juliet (Claire Schoonover), and Nurse (Kecia A. Campbell). Photo by Lew Lorton/Saul Pleeter.

“Kecia A. Campbell ran away with her first scene as the Nurse in Romeo and Juliet: Love Knows No Age at the Unexpected Stage Company in Silver Spring.  She has a real flair for physical comedy, and she handled the language capably and with originality. Kudos to Ms. Campbell for bringing a light touch to one of Shakespeare’s finest tragedies.”

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Cheryl J. Campo as Christmas Eve in Avenue Q Singing “The More You Ruv Someone” at Red Branch Theatre Company

Cheryl J. Campo (Christmas Eve) and Jena Elizabeth (Kate Monster). Photo by Bruce F Press Photography.
Cheryl J. Campo (Christmas Eve) and Jena Elizabeth (Kate Monster). Photo by Bruce F Press Photography.

“Luckily this production has a real jewel in Cheryl J. Campo in the important role of Christmas Eve, the Japanese-American yenta on the block. With her hair piled up in a Bloody Mary bun, Campo nails the humor with expert comic timing and shows obvious vocal breeding in her solo about the emotional toll of a committed relationship-“The More You Ruv Someone.”-John Harding

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Allie Dreskin as Linda Singing “Linda’s Note” and “Let Me Come Home” as Linda in The Wedding Singer at Cockpit in Court

L to R: Allie Dreskin (Linda), Andrew Worthington (Robbie), and Katie Tyler (Julia). Photo by Leo Heppner.
L to R: Allie Dreskin (Linda), Andrew Worthington (Robbie), and Katie Tyler (Julia). Photo by Leo Heppner.

“Special mention and applause should go to Allie Dreskin, who plays Robbie’s ex-fiancee Linda. Dreskin puts the “power” in power ballad, and she commanded the stage during ‘”Let Me Come Home.” I have seen Dreskin in many performances and she always steals the show!”-Lauren Honeycutt

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Tyson Francis as Winthrop Singing “Gary Indiana” in The Music Man at Shenandoah Summer Music Festival

Gary Indiana”: Mrs. Paroo (Elizabeth Albert), Winthrop (Tyson Francis), and Marian (Mackenzie Norris). Photo by C.King Photography
Gary Indiana”: Mrs. Paroo (Elizabeth Albert), Winthrop (Tyson Francis), and Marian (Mackenzie Norris). Photo by C.King Photography

“The crowd-pleasing, scene-stealing, unmitigated joy in this show comes from the appearance of the talented children and teens in this cast. Tyson Francis delivers a heart-rending performance as Winthrop, and his believable stammering yields an emotional punch in “Gary Indiana.”-Valerie O’Keeffe

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Jessie Hooker as Dorothy Singing “Home” in The Wiz at Shenandoah Summer Music Theatre

Dorothy (Jessie Hooker). Photo by C. King Photography.
Dorothy (Jessie Hooker). Photo by C. King Photography.

“When Jessie Hooker (Dorothy) delivers the eleven o’clock number “Home,” her performance is uplifting, powerful, and gorgeous. The song – and the evening – belongs to her.”-Diane Jackson Schnoor

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Kendra Lucas as Evillene Singing “No Bad News” in The Wiz at Shenandoah Summer Music Theatre

Kendra Lucas as Evillene. Photo by C. King Photography.
Kendra Lucas as Evillene. Photo by C. King Photography.

“It is the fiendishly wicked Evillene (Kendra Lucas) who steals the show. With a powerful belt and a sassy wicked glint in her eye, Lucas soars in her sole song “No Bad News” before being vanquished by Dorothy. This is one time you’ll root for the Wicked Witch of the West to rise again and keep on singing.”-Diane Jackson Schnoor

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Kassi Mattera performing the “Chava Ballet” as Chava in Fiddler on the Roof at Howard County Summer Theatre

Kassi Mattera (Chava). Photo courtesy of Howard County Summer Theatre.
Kassi Mattera (Chava). Photo courtesy of Howard County Summer Theatre.

“After her character Chava falls in love with the Russian guard Fyedka, the enchanting Kassi Mattera performs the “Chava Ballet” with such beauty and grace that it took my breath away. Her formal dance training in incredibly apparent, and I cannot wait to see her dance again!”-Lauren Honeycutt

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Rafael Martinez-Salgado as Marcellus Washburn Singing And Dancing in “Shipoopi” in The Music Man at Shenandoah Summer Music Theatre

Rafael Martinez-Salgado. Photo by C. King Photography.
Rafael Martinez-Salgado. Photo by C. King Photography.
“Rafael Martinez-Salgado danced his way into the audience’s heart with a scene-stealing turn as Harold Hill’s hapless sidekick, Marcellus Washburn, particularly in “Shipoopi.”-Valerie O’Keeffe
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Justin Moe as Perchik Singing “Now I Have Everything” in Fiddler on the Roof at Howard County Summer Theatre

Patrick Mason Justin Moe (Perchik) (left) and Kelsey Riechard (Hodel). Photo by Patrick Mason.
Justin Moe (Perchik) (left) and Kelsey Riechard (Hodel). Photo by Patrick Mason.

“Hodel’s love, the radical student Perchik, is played by the amazing Justin Moe, whose performance of “Now I Have Everything” and his solo during “Sunrise, Sunset” show that he is destined for Broadway. His voice is strong and soars during the most emotional parts of the song.”-Lauren Honeycutt

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Cierra Monae as Reverend Hightower Singing “Joyful Noise” in Bat Boy: The Musical at Stillpointe Theatre Initiative

Cierra Monae (Reverend Hightower) and Corey Hennessey (Edgar/Bat Boy). Photo by Rob Clatterbuck.
Cierra Monae (Reverend Hightower) and Corey Hennessey (Edgar/Bat Boy). Photo by Rob Clatterbuck.

“The incredibly effervescent Cierra Monae earned an huge amount of cheers when she sang ‘Joyful Noise’ as Reverend Hightower. Cierra drew every eye in the crowd as she entered the theatre, and we could not take our eyes off of her the entire time she was onstage.“-Lauren Honeycutt

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Haley Ondrejka Singing “Waiting” in The Addams Family at Shenandoah Summer Music Theatre

Haley Ondrejka (Alice). Photo by C. King Photography.
Haley Ondrejka (Alice). Photo by C. King Photography.

“Haley Ondrejka delivered a scene-stealing turn in “Waiting” as her uptight rhyming Alice discovered her, shall we say, darker side. She was hysterically outrageous and the audience and I roared.”-Diane Jackson Schnoor

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Laura Russell as Lady Alice More visiting her husband in prison in A Man for All Seasons at NextStop Theatre Company

Todd Huse and Laura Russell. Photo by Traci J. Brooks Studios.
Todd Huse and Laura Russell. Photo by Traci J. Brooks Studios.

“In a time of tyranny, doing the right thing can cost a person everything — and even worse, it can lead to suffering for that person’s loved ones as well. Laura Russell in A Man for All Seasons exemplified that painful truth, with her layered and moving performance as Lady Alice, wife of the martyred Sir Thomas More. Her surface stoicism was so convincing, for so much of the play, that it was shattering to discover the deep emotions underneath, as she watched her husband unflinchingly following the path to execution. Russell’s performance brought another level of complexity and humanity to the tale of a noble man obeying his conscience, and helped ensure that, while we honor that choice, we never glamorize it or underestimate its difficulties and consequences.”- Gina Dalfonzo

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Ella Schnoor as Amaryllis Singing and Playing the Piano in “Goodnight My Someone” and Harmonizing with Mackenzie Norris as Marian in The Music Man at Shenandoah Summer Music Theatre

“Goodnight, My Someone”: Marian (Mackenzie Norris) and Amaryllis (Ella Schnoor). Photo by C.King Photography.
“Goodnight, My Someone”: Marian (Mackenzie Norris) and Amaryllis (Ella Schnoor). Photo by C.King Photography.

“Ella Schnoor literally brings sunshine to the stage with her mature talents and pitch-perfect performance as Amaryllis. Her sly delivery of the cross-hand piano piece in “Goodnight My Someone” was one of my favorite moments in Act 1.”-Valerie O’Keeffe

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 Camryn Shegogue Singing and Mooing in “Over the Moon” at RENT at Wildwood Summer Theatre

Camryn Shegogue (Maureen Johnson). Photo by Doga Tasdemir.
Camryn Shegogue (Maureen Johnson). Photo by Doga Tasdemir.

“Maureen Johnson sings an ‘udderly’ off the wall song called “Over the Moon” as a protest song to Benny’s reactions and feelings toward the homeless. Camryn Shegogue milked every lyric and every gyration out of this Jonathan Larson showstopper. Camryn has been stealing shows all over the area and here was no exception. It was a powerful, and funny, and outrageous rendition. Didn’t surprise me when the audience went nuts after she was done. So did I.”-Joel Markowitz

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Travis Turner During a Charlie Chaplin Parody at Let Them Eat Chaos at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company

Travis Turner. Photo courtesy of Goodman Theatre.
Travis Turner. Photo courtesy of Goodman Theatre.

“Second City is known for its witty sketch and improv comedy, but the evening’s take on a Charlie Chaplin parody quickly turned somber as the policeman shot an African American woman on stage. As nervous laughter pervaded for a brief moment, Travis Turner stepped forward and asked the audience why they laughed at such a site. What followed was a brilliantly timed and executed spoken word piece that depicted the ever more difficult experience of many African Americans growing up in America today. Turner delivered a prolific performance addressing issues of police brutality and economic inequality, to name a few. Theatre is a tool that can force us to think critically about the world around us, and Second City used that tool in a memorable way here in Let Them Eat Chaos.”-Jamie Joeyen-Waldorf

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Andrew Worthington as Robbie and Katie Tyler as Julia Singing “Grow Old with You” in The Wedding Singer at Cockpit in Court

Katie Tyler (Julia Sullivan) and Andrew Worthington (Robbie Hart). Photo by Leo Heppner.
Katie Tyler (Julia Sullivan) and Andrew Worthington (Robbie Hart). Photo by Leo Heppner.

“The pair share an undeniable chemistry, and they gave me chills during ‘Grow Old with You. Worthington and Tyler turn such a simple song into a meaningful and emotional romantic ballad.”-Lauren Honeycutt

LINKS
DCMetroTheaterArts’ Summer 2015 Scene Stealers: Part 1.

See who we honored as Scene Stealers on DCMetroTheaterArts.